Category Archives: European Vampires

European vampires are quite popular and ancient. There are stories about the Draugr, Dhampir, Lamashtu, Incubus, Volkodlak, Upyr, Upier and Shtriga. The European vampire Lilith is even considered the mother of vampires, being one of the earliest vampires in Hebraic writing.

French Vampires

Vampires tales in France are not as common as in other countries and cultures, but there are a few stories of vampires. One concerned a revenant that terrorized the town of Cadan. The people he attacked seemed destined to become a vampire like him. They retaliated, attacking his corpse and driving a stake through it. […]

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Eretik

An eretik is a Russian vampire. In Russian stories, the vampire is associated with witches and sorcerers, which has been tied to the concept of heresy. Heresy is the deviation on matters essential to orthodox faith. The idea revolved around the idea that the body would not decay normally if death occurred when the individual […]

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Erestuny

In the Olonecian region of Russia, the people spread tales of the erestuny. According the the people of this region, any person, including pious Christians, could become a vampire if a sorcerer entered and took over the body at the moment of death. The peasant would appear to have recovered, but in fact had become […]

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Upir

The Upir is a vampire of Slovakia and Czech Republic. The Upir is thought to have two hearts and two souls. The presence of a second soul is indicated by a corpse’s flexibility, open eyes, two curls in the hair, and a ruddy complexion. The Upir is believed to suck the blood from its victims. […]

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Ustrel

The ustrel was a blood thirsty vampire of Bulgaria. The ustrel was not something that most people could actually see. It was described as the spirit of a child who had been born on a Saturday but died before receiving a baptism. On the ninth day after its burial, the ustrel was thought to work […]

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Obur

The obur, borrowed from the Turkish word for glutton, was the Bulgarian vampire among the Gagauz people. The obur was noted as a gluttonous blood drinker. The obur was vary loud and capable of creating noises, like firecrackers, as well as was known to move objects like a poltergeist. In order to get rid of […]

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Dakhanavar

There are not very many myths about vampires in Armenian history, but there is one vampire that lives in the Armenian mountains. The Dakhanavar is a very ferocious and territorial vampire that will try to assault anyone who tries to make a map of its lands or even count the hills and valleys in the […]

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Bulgarian Vampire

The Bulgarian word for vampire is a variation of the Slavic vampire, derived from the Slavic word ‘opyri/opiri’. It may appear in modern text as vampir, vipir, vepir, or vapir, which is a variation of Russian. The modern idea of the Bulgarian vampire evolved over several centuries. Most commonly, the Bulgarian vampire was associated with […]

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Alp

The Alp (also known as Alb or Alf) is a vampire-like spirit known in German stories. The spirit was associated with the boogeyman and the incubus, normally known for tormenting the nights and dreams of women. The Alp is generally a male or the spirit of a recently deceased man; in other stories, it can […]

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Bruxa

Similar to Mexico’s Tlahuelpocmimi, the Bruxa is a vampire witch of Portugal. The Bruxa is a pre-Christian figure that became prominent in the Middle Ages at the time the Inquisition was focusing their attention on Pagan believes and malevolent activities of Satan. The Bruxa was generally a woman is considered a vampire because of her […]

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